Reasonable Suspicion and Probable Cause, explained by Michigan criminal defense attorneys Czarnecki & Taylor

What is the difference between probable cause and reasonable suspicion?

Many people, including lawyers, do not draw a clear distinction between probable cause and reasonable suspicion.  This article explains the differences between the two standards granting the police the authority to stop, detain and search an individual.

This article explains the differences between probable cause and reasonable suspicion, the two standards giving the police the authority to stop, detain and search an individual.
This article explains the differences between probable cause and reasonable suspicion, the two standards giving the police the authority to stop, detain and search an individual.

Any analysis of a search and seizure must begin with the Fourth Amendment.  Both the Michigan and the United States constitutions protect citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures.  US Const, Am IV; Const 1963, art 1, § 11.   The key word is “unreasonable” searches and seizures.  The constitutions do not forbid searches and seizures, only unreasonable ones.  Text of Fourth Amendment

Continue reading “Reasonable Suspicion and Probable Cause, explained by Michigan criminal defense attorneys Czarnecki & Taylor”